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Can lupins be overwatered?

Growing lupins can be a real treat for all gardeners. But if you are new to growing lupins then you will undoubtedly have numerous questions, questions such as can lupins be overwatered? Well, let’s jump in and have a look, I have tonnes of experience growing lupins over the years so let me help you out!

Gorgeous Lupins
Gorgeous Lupins

Can lupins be overwatered?

Yes, they can. In fact, lupins really don’t like wet, heavy soil. They are susceptible to crown root rot and as such overwatering can be devastating to them.

lupins are happy in most conditions, but the one thing they really don’t like is overly wet roots. They don’t like heavy, wet soil and much prefer more free-draining soil.

So as you can imagine, if they don’t like constantly damp roots then there is a real chance of overwatering them. Most lupins if planted in the ground won’t need much watering at all unless we are experiencing a prolonged summer dry spell.

If in pots then they will need more frequent watering. Just make sure the pot has plenty of draining holes and as long as you are not watering the plant multiple times a day you will be fine.

More on Lupins

Lupins are a beautiful flower that you will find in many British gardens. Lupins are a staple of British cottage gardens, famed for both their height and colour. Originally hailing from the Mediterranean they are a perennial that will greet you with a gorgeous display year after year.

Lupins in a border
Lupins in a border

As you can imagine from a Mediterranean plant they like full sun but can do just as well in dappled or partial shade as long as they get full sun for a chunk of the day.

They produce a large flowering spike that is full of colour and each plant can have lots of these spikes leading to a fabulous display. They will begin to flower around may and can last well into June. The flowers do go to seed quite quickly but your lupin will continue to produce more and more new spikes.

To get the best out of these spikes though it is essential to deadhead the old spikes to give the new ones a chance to flourish. Also cutting your lupins back in autumn can help them the following spring. The seeds are edible but if not treated properly first they can be poisonous to animals and humans. Greenfly can be a common problem for lupins here in the UK.