When To Divide Rudbeckia

When To Divide Rudbeckia?

Is your rudbeckia getting a little too big for its boots? Starting to take up too much room? Or are the flowers getting a little small? It’s time to divide your rudbeckia, but when is the best time to divide rudbeckia?

When To Divide Rudbeckia
When To Divide Rudbeckia

When To Divide Rudbeckia?

Spring is the best time as it gives your plants a full season to recover from this trauma and put on new growth. This helps them to be really well established before winter rolls around again.

April is about the time I normally divide rudbeckia, but it can also depend a lot on the weather that year. If we are getting late frosts or really poor wet weather then just delay dividing your plant for a couple of weeks.

The dividing of rudbeckia can also be done in the autumn but I prefer spring as it gives the plants longer before winter to recover. If you missed dividing your plants in spring though then feel free to go for it in the autumn.

Why Divide Rudbeckia

To start with it can turn into a very large plant after a few years and can start dominating the border, so dividing it helps you to keep it more controllable.

One of the main reasons though is for the health of the plant. Older rudbeckia tends to start producing fewer and fewer flowers and the ones that they do produce are much smaller.

Dividing the plant rejuvenates it and it almost becomes a brand new plant again.

How To Divide Rudbeckia

Use a garden fork and gently lift your rudbeckia roots. Go as wide as possible when digging in order to preserve the roots of the plant as much as possible.

You then need to cut all those roots up into smaller plants. Sometimes you can just go full hulk mode and rip it apart with your hands, but the more civilised way is to use a handsaw. Then you can just replant the fresh plants as usual.

Water well while they are establishing, remember they have just lost a huge chunk of their root structure and what is left is now damaged so give them a helping hand.

More On Rudbeckia

Rudbeckia is a member of the Asteraceae family, which is a huge family of plants by the way, along with asters, calendula and daisies.

Rudbeckia is a very popular species of plant, they look gorgeous and are easy to grow, two factors that will always lead to popularity.

Most Rudbeckia are hardy perennials when grown in the UK but there are a couple of types that are only grown as annuals due to our colder winters.

In general, it is the yellow Rudbeckia that are perennial with most other colourways being annual plants.

What Conditions Do Rudbeckia Like?

Rudbeckia like a sunny spot and well-draining soil. They don’t like their roots drying out though so need to be watered during dry spells. They really don’t like their roots being in standing water either though which is why well-draining soil is a must.

Although they like a sunny spot they can also survive in partial shade but with reduced flowering.

What Rudbeckia Should I Grow?

Looking to find the perfect Rudbeckia for your garden? Here are some of my favourite varieties.

Goldsturm

Winner of the RHS Award of Garden Merit this is what you would call a classic Rudbeckia. Long yellow petals lead to a dark black centre on daisy-like flowers.

A fan favourite for bees, butterflies and other pollinators, Goldsturm will be a hub of activity in no time at all.

Rudbeckia Goldsturm
Rudbeckia Goldsturm

Sunbeckia

The Rudbeckia Sunbeckia Series was bred for exceptionally large, long-lasting flowers in unique colours. From early summer all the way into autumn, Rudbeckia ‘Sunbeckia Mia’ produces a stunning display of abundant, bi-coloured flowers that are yellow on the outside and deep red on the inside. 

Find it at Suttons

All Sorts Mixed

Mixed packs of Rudbeckia seeds or plants are available from most online seed retailers. These mixed rudbeckias look amazing when grown in pots or packed into a border.

Find it at Sutton’s.