10 perennial herbs

10 Perennial Herbs You Should Grow!

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I used to treat herbs as an afterthought at the allotment, never giving them much space until the fruit and veg were well taken care of.

That changed when I started to grow more and more herbs. I quickly saw how useful they were in the kitchen and how they levelled up my cooking game.

But not only that, they also look stunning in the garden, with many producing flower displays to rival your best annual flowers.

And then there are the pollinators; they love the flowers on many herbs and seem drawn in by them.

When it comes to growing herbs, what can be easier than perennial herbs that come back year after year? So with that in mind, here are ten perennial herbs you should be growing!

10 Perennial Herbs To Grow

Chives

Chives are cold-tolerant herbs that are best planted in early to mid-spring for an early summer harvest.

They grow well in full sun but also tolerate light shade. The soil should be moist and well-draining for chives to thrive.

Chives
Chives

Mint

You can grow many different mints, including spearmint, chocolate mint, and peppermint.

Each has its unique flavour and can be used for different purposes.

Mint grows well in partial shade and can quickly spread. I suggest planting mint in a container to prevent it from taking over your garden space.

Mint
Mint

Rosemary

Rosemary prefers well-draining soil and full sunlight.

Rosemary is incredibly versatile and can be used in numerous dishes.

A bee on a rosemary flower
A bee on a rosemary flower

Thyme

Thyme is another one of my favourites because it’s a compact, low-growing herb that enjoys full sunlight and well-draining soil.

I like planting thyme near pathways or rock gardens, where it can release its fragrance as people brush past it.

Thyme in full flower
Thyme in full flower

Sage

Sage is relatively low-maintenance, making it a great addition to any herb garden.

Sage can go dormant in the winter but comes back strong in spring.

Sage
Sage

Oregano

Oregano is a versatile perennial herb that thrives in poor soils and spreads quickly.

While it is a perennial, it needs some care to survive a UK winter. It can survive in the ground but needs a sheltered spot and well-draining soil.

If possible, grow it in a container where you can move it to a greenhouse or polytunnel over winter.

I love oregano’s tiny pale purple flowers that last for weeks and attract pollinators.

Oregano
Oregano

Lavender

Lavender is known for its calming fragrance, but it also produces beautiful purple flowers that attract pollinators.

Plant lavender in full sun and well-draining soil, spacing the plants at least 18 inches apart for optimal growth.

Bee on lavender
Bee on lavender

Fennel

Fennel has a unique, slightly sweet, anise-like flavour that adds layers to culinary dishes.

Common fennel should not be confused with Florence fennel. The former is a herb, and the latter is more of a vegetable.

Common fennel is also a perennial, whereas Florence fennel is an annual.

Common Fennel
Common Fennel

Lemon Balm

Lemon balm is an incredibly easy-to-grow herb. In fact, it might be a little too easy to grow…

As with mint, I recommend keeping this in a pot to prevent it from taking over your garden!

Lemon Balm
Lemon Balm

Tarragon

Tarragon is a perennial herb with a distinct anise-like flavour. I have found it to be rather low-maintenance, preferring slightly sandy soil in a sunny location.

Tarragon adds a unique flavour to numerous dishes, and I love using fresh leaves in my recipes.

The only thing to remember with tarragon is that the soil must be well-draining, it hates heavy wet clay soils.

Tarragon
Tarragon

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